Clint Malarchuk’s Scar: How Much Blood Did He Lose During the Accident? spritelybud.com

Clint Malarchuk’s Scar: How Much Blood Did He Lose During the Accident?

Clint Malarchuk has a scar on his neck from a horrible accident during a game in 1989.  During the match, St. Louis Blue’s Steve Tuttle and Buffalo Sabres’ Uwe Krupp collided forcefully into the goal crease, and Tuttle’s skate blade struck Malarchuk’s neck, severing his carotid artery and partially piercing his jugular vein. He nearly died after losing 1.5 liters of blood. To close the six-inch wound, it took doctors a total of 3oo stitches.

Clint Malarchuk is most remembered for a horrible on-ice accident on March 22, 1989, during a game between the Buffalo Sabres and the St. Louis Blues. During the game, Sabres player Steve Yzerman’s skate accidentally struck Malarchuk’s jugular vein, resulting in severe bleeding.

Malarchuk was transported to the hospital and had emergency surgery. So how much blood did he lose? How many stitches did he get? Continue reading this article to find out more about the former Canadian ice hockey goaltender‘s accident and scar.

Previously, we touched on the stories of Sharon Marshall and Ellie Taylor.

Clint Malarchuk Still Has a Visible Scar on His Neck From a Horrible Accident During a Game in 1989: He Lost Nearly 1.5 Liters of Blood and Got 30 Stitches!

Clint Malarchuk has a scar on his neck from a horrible accident during a game in 1989. During the match, Sabres player Steve Yzerman’s skate accidentally struck Malarchuk’s neck, severing his carotid artery and partially piercing his jugular vein.

The sight physically nauseated several viewers. His significant blood loss prompted eleven fans to faint, two more to suffer heart attacks, and three players to vomit on the ice.

Clint Malarchuk got a scar on his neck after a horrible accident occurred during a game in 1989. spritelybud.comClint Malarchuk got a scar on his neck after a horrible accident occurred during a game in 1989.
Image Source: Denverpost

After discovering what had happened, local TV cameras monitoring the game pulled away from the image of Malarchuk bleeding, and the broadcasters were also visibly frightened.

Meanwhile, the former ice hockey goaltender was convinced that he was going to die. He just wanted to get off the ice because he didn’t want his mother to witness him die while she was watching the game on TV. He had an equipment manager contact her and tell her how much he loved her. Then he requested for a priest.

His life was saved when the Sabres’ athletic trainer, Jim Pizzutelli, a veteran US Army combat medic who participated in the Vietnam War, acted quickly. He held Clint’s neck and pinched off the vein, refusing to let go until physicians came to start bandaging the wound.

He guided Malarchuk off the ice before applying intense pressure to his collarbone which aimed to generate a low breathing rate and low metabolic state, which is preferable to exsanguination.

On the route to the hospital, Clint was aware and talking, and playfully asked paramedics if they could bring him back in time for the third quarter.

When league officials learned that he was in stable condition, the game was resumed. He nearly died after losing 1.5 liters of blood. To close the six-inch wound, it took doctors a total of 3oo stitches. However, he was back on the ice after 1o days.

The scar on Clint Malarchuk's neck is still visible today. spritelybud.comThe scar on Clint Malarchuk’s neck is still visible today.
Image Source: NHL

The scar on Clint’s neck is still visible today. It is a keloid scar which is a raised and bumpy form of scar. On the other hand, a variety of reasons, including injury, surgery, and acne, can result in keloid scars.

The Canadian former ice-hokey player has stated that the scar doesn’t bother him it reminds him of the day he almost died, and he feels thankful to be alive. Malarchuk has also admitted that his scar has assisted him in connecting with those who have undergone terrible injuries.

What Does Clint Malarchuk Do in 2023?

Clint Malarchuk is a 62-year-old former Canadian ice hockey goaltender who played National Hockey League between 1981 to 1992. He is now a motivational speaker and advocate for mental health. He travels around the United States and Canada delivering speeches on his difficulties with PTSD, depression, anxiety, drinking, and suicidal ideation.

He also works with military veterans and first responders to assist them in dealing with mental health issues. In addition to his speaking commitments, the motivational speaker is the co-founder of the Clint Malarchuk Foundation, which helps people suffering from mental illness.

He has written two books, A Matter of Inches, and The Crazy Game. He is a tremendous advocate for mental health awareness, and his effort is making a difference in many people’s lives.